Monday, December 8, 2014

Goddesses in the Dust: A Real Life Terpsichore




Who is Terpsichore? you might be asking yourself. In ancient Greece, she was one of the nine muses, the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory. She and her sisters, Clio, Thalia, Erato, Euterpe, Polyhymnia, Kalliope, Urania and Melpomene were believed to reside above Mounts Olympus, Parnassus and Pindus and were the inspiration and patrons for poets, musicians, dramatists of tragedy and comedy, sacred hymns and authors, such as Homer. Terpsichore was the muse of the dance and the Greek chorus. Theater was a major form of entertainment in ancient Greece and she was thought to inspire dramatists in writing plays, which included the all important chorus who told the story. 

At a recent Saint's Day festival in Greece, it would seem the muse of Terpsichore is still hard at work, as you can see in the faces of these men...


...for as the goddess of dance approaches, she is welcomed, as ever, on bended knee and with open arms.

Only those who don't strive after life
Truly respect life.

Lao-Tzu

9 comments:

  1. I love how you are always able to find the ancient in the modern. It just goes to show you that some things are eternal.

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    1. I guess it's the archaeologist in me - always digging :))

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  2. Yes, she's alive and keeping up with the times.

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    1. It's refreshing to see the goddess essence is still alive and well in Greece!

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  3. Those admirers look positively smitten. :)

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  4. Listening to Greek music, I don’t think anyone can stay sitting down – the music is so enthralling that one has to dance. Every time I have been to Greece I bought some cassettes at first, and lately some CDs, as I find that music enchanting.

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  5. The Greeks knew how to worship the things that make life more joyful: the goddess of dance! I love their expressions.

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