Monday, November 10, 2014

Goddesses in the Dust: The Wind is Talking on Ithaka

An archaeologist unearths the divine feminine, one archetype at a time...

I've always thought the wind spoke. It would seem all the winds in Greece are named for male gods: Boreas, the god of the north wind and winter, Eurus, the god of the east wind, Notus, god of the south and Zephyrus, god of the west wind. But the breezes are feminine. The Aurai, known as nymphs, were also daughters of the god Anemos, which means wind. 

Whether it be male or female, after many years of visiting the Greek island of Ithaka, I can safely say that the wind does a lot of talking here. Along the harbor where ships dock side by side, it threads its way through the masts, knocking them against one another and whistling its mysterious and eerie sound as it rattles the halyards. Walking along the pier in the town of Kioni, this glass globe filled with oil caught my eye. As I gazed at the sun reflecting in the amber liquid the wind started to talk. 

Instead of answering its mournful call, I just listened

16 comments:

  1. Yes, the wind speaks. Although I link to a male poetic voice here, I love this urgent creative hammering : http://www.poetry-chaikhana.com/blog/2011/06/27/d-h-lawrence-song-of-a-man-who-has-come-through/

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    1. Robert, Thank you for sending me this extraordinary poem. I am humbled at the fact of this showing up at a point in my life just when I need to hear this message. That old saying, "when the student is ready the teacher will appear" is true. Thank you for being one of them. xoxo

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  2. Such intriguing conversations! But my Greek isn't very good. Do you know what they were talking about?

    Blessings and Bear hugs!

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    1. A good question, Rob. Somehow I think they are imparting a deep wisdom, a wind borne version of the Apollonian axiom: Know Thyself.

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  3. the wind does have a distinct voice on the coast... I'd never considered it, just one more thing I love about the sea

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    1. Yes, and particularly that threshold space where the sea meets the land...

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    2. exactly - I would never profess to be seafaring

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  4. Boreas is about to blow my house down tonight. All interesting. Does it get cold in Greece?

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    1. Me too Donna! He's blowing up a storm here as well - seems like a deep cold is descending upon the lower 48.

      It does get cold in Greece, but not like our winters. It rains, can snow on the mountain tops and gets cold at higher altitudes. But the sun can come out in mid winter as well and warm the earth and soul.

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  5. thanks to this movie I felt like being there, feeling the wind blowing around and the sun shining:)

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    1. You've heard this as well, haven't you Ola? Greece has its very own wind that blows nowhere else :))

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  6. Lovely image and sound of a talking wind. Shall we call you the wind whisperer?

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  7. An intriguing thought, Sarah. (I have to admit that I enjoy that movie The Horse Whisperer even though it was not well reviewed by critics.)

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  8. I'm happy to know I'm not the only person who thinks the wind whispers to them :) x

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  9. Another wind lover :) I adore the winds. They have different names here too. I think the winds whisper many secrets to me too.

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  10. Does anybody remember the scene in The English Patient when Almasy is with Katherine in the car during the desert sandstorm and he tells her about all the types of winds? Everyone's lovely responses reminded me of that wonderful film...

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