Friday, December 4, 2015

Waiting to be Healed

I love the silver and gold votives known in Greek as tamata. These little metal cards that the devoted affix to the iconostasis - the screen separating the altar from the congregation -  represent the hopes, wishes, prayers and dreams of the faithful. On the hammered surface you will find images of a leg that needs healing, a house one is in debt over, a car needing repairs, a heart about to undergo an operation - or that has just been broken- and a ship representing the wish for a safe journey. 

We all wish and pray for things in life. The Greeks just lay theirs down in metal. 

12 comments:

  1. Hi Amanda, haven't heard from you in a while. Must be busy. Very interesting about tamara, very much like the Spanish milagros. Sundance catalog has a milage Christmas tree in the catalog now that is great, but I don't need another thing.

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    1. Hi Donna, I've been traveling a lot lately so away from the blog world but hope to be back with more posts soon...yes, tamata are very similar to the Spanish milagros. I'll have to take a look at that Christmas tree!

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  2. i was nervous when i saw the title of this post. i'm glad the subject is your usual fascinating information and not about yourself.

    it's nice to hear from you, amanda. happy happy holidays

    love
    kj

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    1. So sorry I gave you a scare - it didn't occur to me when I wrote the title...
      wishing you a very Happy Holidays too dear KJ xoxo

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  3. Ah, the power of prayer is felt everywhere. Happy holidays to you and yours.

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    1. It certainly is, Rosaria, and we need it now more than never it seems - wishing you are yours a blessed holiday as well xoxo

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  4. I was scared of them when i was a kid!

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    1. I guess they can seem a bit weird to a kid!!

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  5. The title made me nervous to read on… then such a beautiful post :-)

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    1. Thank you Agnes - I didn't think about how the title might give a wrong impression :(

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  6. Do they still do that in Greece? The tradition was popular here too but it has died out now. You can still see the metal medallions in the churches though.

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    1. They do Loree - the tradition is very much alive and well in Greece~

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