Monday, December 22, 2014

Goddesses in the Dust: Frigga, Mistletoe and the Winter Solstice

An archaeologist unearths the divine feminine, one archetype at a time...

The Winter Solstice, which occurs December 21-22, marks the longest night of the year. Many of our religious traditions are rooted in this season when the light lasts for the shortest amount of time and is seemingly overwhelmed by darkness. Both Christian and Jewish traditions celebrate major holidays at this time of year, marking the return of light from darkness with the birth of Christ, and the Jewish holiday Hanukkah, known as the festival of lights.  

In northern Europe this spark of light in the darkness is woven into the story of the goddess Frigga, also known as Mother Night. Frigga labored in the darkness to bring her son, Baldur, into the world on this night. Baldur was a fertility god who brought rain and sun to ensure the harvest. Unfortunately, Baldur was killed by a dart from the mistletoe plant, but Frigga's grief was so great that the plant took pity on her. Baldur is restored to life and the grateful Frigga, whose tears formed the plant's white berries, reversed the curse of the mistletoe and transformed it into a symbol of love, promising good things to all who kiss underneath it. 

Wishing everyone a peaceful and blessed holiday season and may many wonderful wishes come true under your mistletoe♡

11 comments:

  1. Wonderful stories to keep us hopeful and focused toward the light. Thanks for sharing such treasures with your readers all throughout the year. Happy holidays to you and yours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Rosaria - blessings to you and yours xoxo

      Delete
  2. I love how all the ancient legends live on to this day. Have a wonderful Christmas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy Holidays to you as well Loree! xoxo

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Fascinating! I didn't know the tragic story behind mistletoe. My inlaws have it growing wild in their yard in England. Have a merry Christmas!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never seen mistletoe in the wild ~ it must induce kissing year round ;))

      Happy Holidays Sarah to you and your family xo

      Delete
  5. :) I hope your wishes come true under the mistletoe, Sis. Lovely winter post to give hope as the sun rises later and later in the morning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks dear Suze! Wishing you the same for all the best in the New Year for you and your family xoxo

      Delete
  6. Merry Christmas from snowy Vienna. May 2015 bring you health, happiness and success.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you Thomas :))
    Wishing you all the best in the New Year as well from the non snowy (yet!) Midwest!! xo

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting♡