Monday, January 27, 2014

Beaufort - Books, Santini and the Big Chill


There is a bookstore in Beaufort, South Carolina, in which I could spend hours wandering around, and sometimes do.

The owner has created a seemingly senseless jumble of categories that somehow make sense. Sometimes I get tired of shopping at a Big Box store; there is something quaint and nonlinear about this place, it's practically archaeological in nature.

The sections are organized randomly, no ISBN nonsense here



With dog eared copies of classics


and not so dog eared

Love the fact that Cliff's Notes are catalogued next to Plato and the Aeneid

The writer Pat Conroy lives in Beaufort, and his books are prominently displayed. 

Several of Conroy's books have been made into movies, including The Great Santini and The Prince of Tides. Both were filmed on location in Beaufort, as well as the movie The Big Chill, using the area's sprawling southern plantation style homes. Perhaps you recognize the house where The Great Santini was filmed (as well as The Big Chill)

and the house in The Prince of Tides

where Nick Nolte's character, as a young boy, runs out with his siblings at the beginning of the film and jumps off the pier to escape their parents, who are engaged in a screaming match...

and his mother, Lida's house, where he meets with her towards the end.

Nolte's character drives across a bridge at the film's end; this one, which connects Beaufort to Hunting and Fripp Islands. At the bridge's mid-point he declares his love and gratitude to his psychiatrist, played by Barbra Streisand, calling out her name, "Lowenstein, Lowenstein." 


We crossed the bridge and caught one of the Low Country's gorgeous sunsets 

The South has produced its share of virtuoso writers

I try to take home something from this bookshop with every visit, so what better than the collected stories of one of its finest daughters?

22 comments:

  1. Thanks for taking me along, Amanda. I so enjoyed it. I read on the Huffington Post today, that Barnes and Noble was going the way of the dinosaur. I will die. The small stores will be all that's left. I can't imagine people wanting their virtual books via Kindle. I guess I am so behind the times, clinging on to something that is going the way of the dinos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's hard to believe Borders is gone. Maybe the upside is there will be a resurgence of the small book store?

      Delete
  2. What a wonderful store. I know I would love it there. Nothing beats the search for a good book.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I liked your comment on KJ's blog about not joining other "social media."

    I've with you on Flannery, although I only read the one novel by her.

    It's beautiful country down there (have you visited Brookgreen Gardens?), so intensely alive as is exemplified by the live oaks, which are surely among the most beautiful of trees.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've not visited Brookgreen Gardens, would love to know where they are!

      Delete
  4. Nonlinear is good! I love this kind of place. Chance discoveries in a non-Amazon world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Chance discoveries in a non-Amazon world, indeed, Robert ~

      Delete
  5. Lida's house is beautiful.

    As a non-linear bookshop aficionado, I found myself squinting at the spines in every picture!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That house faces the bay and catches the setting sun in all its awe-inspiring glory...talk about location!

      I had a blast squinting at all those spines myself - endless fun...

      Delete
  6. When I saw Beaufort, I thought of the Beaufort Sea, in Canada's arctic. I thought it was a bit of a stretch at the time, but one never knows. I now see the error of my assumption. Glad you're having a grand time in the south; ideal location for a lady such as yourself.

    Blessings and Bear hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Must check out this other, likely chillier, Beaufort!

      Delete
  7. so you can dig out something really interesting there:)

    ReplyDelete
  8. was so happy recently to find a used bookstore near the town i am moving to in the states (if immigration ever gets her skirts together). not only is it unorganized, it is so proud it calls itself "The Unorganized Bookstore" and goes so far as to have no order whatsoever:) heh. still found some gems though. in this world of custom everything its a chance for serendipity, isn't it?

    xo
    erin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank Goddess for that serendipity, Erin. Blessings on your upcoming move - your destination sounds all the more appealing for possessing a bookstore of that name~

      Delete
  9. What a wonderful bookstore! It was interesting to see the house from the Prince of Tides. I love the binding on the O'Connor stories! Good choice.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wow I'm glad I came by today. The bookshop looks like heaven, and this part of the country is where my dad's family originally hailed from (Hartsville). I have not spent enough time down there, though I long to. I just love Pat Conroy, and his whole ethos. That scene when the kids jump off the dock into the water in Prince of Tides is one of my best film memories. Thank you for these steps through literature, an old bookshop, and a lovely part of the world.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I love these kinds of places, corners and cubbies all full of surprises. Thanks for taking us along.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I cannot wait to get back to the US and explore! I see a roadtrip to South Carolina in my future :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. Personally I'd go for the Cliff Notes before picking up Virgil. There are not so many of these little stores left today, but we do have Powell's here in Portland. Not so little. But, the people are still the real thing and more often than not that's what makes a bookstore good. These houses are beautiful Amanda.
    You know what this store reminds me of are the now old-fashioned video stores that are so hard to find.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used to frequent a mom and pop video store myself, and I feel a pang for its passing as well (but I'm a sentimentalist at heart). I've heard of Powell's and I believe there is a strong writers community in Portland - it sounds like a cool artists' haven.

      Delete
  14. the closest bookstore (not counting barnes/noble) is 141 miles west. as soon as the roads clear, and the wind out of yellowstone calms down, i am headed there. this post was savory. and your post about 111- i have always told my kids that something/someone was trying to reach us, reassure us, whenever we would notice the number. but to not go looking for it. it had to appear on its own. loved your post. xo s

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thank you for taking us to so many interesting places. Most I will never venture to, but I did live in South Carolina during the 80's..Never went to Beaufort, I will make plans to visit...I will read Conroy..a month ago I watched several YouTube interviews..Long Live the "Indie Bookstores"...I have discovered a very organized and complete USED book store in Gladewater, Texas in an old department store,,,it is fullll of books...my favorite "clinic" for when I cant "Tango" (more recent post of yours..) Thanks for the post,, glenn

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting♡