Monday, June 3, 2013

Ruins and Fortune

An archaeologist unearths the divine feminine, one archetype at a time...

At the westernmost end of the Roman Empire, in the hills of what is now central Portugal, sit the ruins of Conimbriga, a bustling settlement that once supported over 10,000 citizens. Today, the site is known for the best preserved Roman ruins outside of Italy.


The site has gorgeous mosaics


And the remains of a large complex of baths with an underground heating system 




A central courtyard has been partially restored with beautiful plantings and a fountain




Surrounded by figural mosaics of gods and goddesses


The people of ancient Conimbriga were indeed lucky to live in such a lush natural setting


in which all their needs were taken care of


So perhaps it is no coincidence


that their inhabitants worshipped the deity of luck and chance



and purveyor of bounty


the Roman goddess Fortuna.





12 comments:

  1. O, Fortuna!

    Those mosaics are impeccably-rendered, Sis. I can just imagine all of the images you're not posting. You must have such a fine collection.

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  2. Those ancient Romans never fail to amaze me. I wish I could see the Empire in its heyday.

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  3. So ingenious and also warriors. We seem to have followed the same path. I like to think we as a species have evolved and I wonder why we have not too evolved in how we deal with conflict . Then I see this, and Pompeii and I'm reminded they then and we now are equally intelligent. Maybe my wish for the evolution of non violent conflict is just unrealistic :-(

    You walk on so much sacred ground, Amanda xo

    Love
    kj

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    1. I don't think your wish for the evolution of nonviolence is unrealistic. While we can learn a lot from our shared history as humans, we can never stop working towards such a future.

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  4. The time and effort that it took to make such a fine living area can be astounding. The mosaics and incredibly intricate.

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    1. I found myself thinking the same thing: what would it have been like to see such artwork pass beneath one's feet every day?

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  5. Wonderful pictures, thank you!

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  6. Just beautiful. Is it just me, or does it seem that this goddess lives only among the ruins now?

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  7. Sometimes I save your posts for the perfect moment. Your new post goes up and I savor the waiting to read the stories and see the awesome pictures. This one fit the bill exactly!

    I just can't even imagine living with those amazing mosaics but the ancient Romans may have said the same thing about our wallpaper.

    Lovely delicious fulfilling post Amanda

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  8. We haven't abandoned Fortuna in our modern world; how else do we explain the stock-market?

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